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Posts Tagged ‘creative’

The other night while watching “Up in the Air” I wondered if people who are laid off are going after their dreams. Because I am. I overlook that I’m a part of that statistic. I haven’t forgotten I was laid off, but mostly I’m so happy that being laid off now feels like the company did me a huge favor. After the sourness of the ego waned and pride dissipated, I feel great to be a person going after my “real” dream. So, watching this movie I thought, am I alone? Will we see a resurgence of the arts in 10 years because people are returning to their long-forgotten creative roots? When I was young, I would lie in bed and write in my notebook (which I still have) and create poetry that sounds beyond the scope of a 15 or 16 year-old. But I never thought – hey, I’ll be a writer when I grow up. However, as an adult when playing the game “Would You Rather” and being asked if I’d rather be a famous rock star or a famous novelist, the latter always won out. On the same subject, I’d rather have my bottom half be a horse than have scales all over my body.

When I was young, I dreamed of competing on Star Search. I can dance and could do flips back in the day (okay, I tried a few yesterday on the grass but my 30 year-old body wasn’t so into it) and although I had these abilities, I never felt that I could really follow a dream of being a dancer or even teaching dance. I have a fascination with interior design and clothing design, but again these careers felt out of reach. And I’m thinking I’m not alone. So, with all of us who have been laid off in the last few years, how many of us are now going after the dream? After I pondered this resurgence for love of what we do, I did a little research. Nope, not alone. ABC World News reported on reinventing yourself after layoff. I also found a documentary called Lemonade with a slogan that says, “It’s not a pink slip. It’s a blank page.”

I haven’t been writing much on my blog because I’m swamped with work — school work. I am reading the most wonderfully diverse, literary books and I am writing in a way that I didn’t know I was capable. I’m exploring my mind, pushing further, being asked by my advisor “to descend into the unknown.” This is the hardest job I’ve ever had and I’m not the best at it, but it feels worthwhile and I want to learn, and be better and try my hardest. Creativity is a wonderful thing and was lost to me for so many years. So if you’re facing a lay-off or know someone who is, ask them what they really want to do in life. You might be surprised by the answer.

And in a few years, let’s see if this creative resurgence has turned into feeling again like the four-letter word — work. I hope not! P.S. We leave in two weeks and four days for our two-month long trip to Asia. I will be posting more of our adventures this summer!

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School is Cool

“I will never go back to school.” – Paula A.

“I am not a ‘school person.'” – Paula A.

“School is not where I do my best.” – Paula A.

I said these things not too long ago, just as recently as 2008. Never is a word I used often about school. I was raised by hard-working parents, but both came from families that lacked educational ambition. My grandparents finished high school only and my parents each completed less than a year or so in college, neither finishing a degree. This is not necessarily wrong, but it shaped how I felt about higher education. I was taught to find a career in which I could make money and support myself, which are excellent life lessons, but there was no emphasis on continuing education for the sake of learning. I am fortunate to have joined a family in which education is a priority. My husband Ben’s grandparents both survived the Holocaust separately, meeting each other in Illinois following their release from concentration and work camps. They made education a priority, realizing that no one can ever take that from you. Each earned their PhD in chemistry, worked at Dupont, and Ben’s grandmother even invented some common household products. They passed on this love for education and higher learning to their children (two doctors and a lawyer) and grandchildren (my husband Ben is working on his PhD). This family issued the support and love of education I needed to believe in myself.

I start my Master’s of Fine Arts in creative writing in February. So in the meantime, I enrolled at the University of Utah as a non-matriculated student, which means I am graded with my peers, but the credits don’t go towards anything. This was a way to get back into the swing of things since it has been eight years since I left college and said I was NEVER going back to school. I found out that I LOVE school. Saying never gets you nowhere. I learned more in four months of school than I have since I started my communications career. I gained knowledge and fostered creativity that make me proud of who I am and what I am working on. I adored my classmates, the curriculum and especially my professors. And best of all, I realized that I am a good student when I enjoy the curriculum. I earned two As and an A-, the highest grades I’ve had in college.

Don’t let “never” be your road block. I am a fortunate person with so many people who believe in me, but what I needed most was to believe in myself. And remember how I said I was never going back to China? Well, there’s a 99 percent chance we’ll be back there in May. Ben will teach classes again and possibly work on a research project for an eco-tourist island off of Shanghai, while I’ll work remotely on my graduate school work.

Lastly, please pick up a copy of Park City Magazine’s winter issue. My article on Park City Iron Man is on page 28 of the second section. Thanks again to Kristen for allowing me the opportunity and publishing my first piece. Thanks to Park City Iron Man for the interview, friendship and incredible craftsmanship. Our dining room table shines in our new home!

Happy New Year! Make a resolution to say no to never!!

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Right now, in between the paragraphs that I write, I’m studying quantitative comparisons for the GRE. Oy vey, it’s tough. My brain just doesn’t comprehend this stuff. Like x+y=429, and then is x bigger than y, but if y is squared and who cares! I’ve been sitting at this desk for hours now and I’m not sure if I’ll ever understand math. I am so glad that creative writing has very little, if anything, to do with math. Otherwise, I’d be in big trouble. 

It’s interesting how people use different sides of their brain (and some don’t use their brain at all!). I am captivated by the creative in things, whether it’s writing, film, art or street acts. But what is it worth? How do you put a price tag on the abstract?

And that leads me to wonder, how does one conceptualize and then create that thought into art? The following You Tube video is a few minutes long, but so worth watching. Just the thought of it is priceless.

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